Tag: Baseball Hall of Fame

Miguel Cabrera, Albert Pujols Lead B/R’s All-HOF Team in MLB Today

After Wednesday's announcement of the 2017 Hall of Fame inductees, most of the talk is about Barry Bonds, Roger Clemens, performance-enhancing drugs and the like. I wrote something on the subject if you're not sick of it yet. Here's another interesting question, though: Which current MLB players would make the Hall if their careers ended today? Who, in other words, has already stacked up the statistics, awards and intangibles to punch a ticket to Cooperstown? It's not a scientific exercise, obviously. Voting members of the Baseball Writers' Association of America have a proven ability to confound. Mike Piazza waited four years to get in, to cite one example, while Ivan Rodriguez slipped through on the first ballot. Two all-time great catchers, both from the steroid era with suspicion but no hard proof of illicit chemical enhancement, two different results. There are cases like that throughout the Hall's history, including many that aren't clouded by PEDs and some ...




Curt Schilling Argues with Fake Sidney Ponson on Twitter After Hall of Fame Vote

Jeff Bagwell, Ivan Rodriguez and Tim Raines were all inducted into the Baseball Hall of Fame on Wednesday, but former MLB ace Curt Schilling missed the cut, per BBWAA.com. He took out some of his frustrations in an argument with a fake Twitter account for former pitcher Sidney Ponson (warning: NSFW): Mike Oz of Yahoo Sports captured the entire conversation (warning: NSFW):   Players need 75 percent of the votes to be inducted, and Schilling received just 45 percent. Buster Olney of ESPN The Magazine noted Schilling's percentage of votes "collapsed from 52.3 [in 2016] to 45." From 1988 to 2007, Schilling played for the Baltimore Orioles, Houston Astros, Philadelphia Phillies, Arizona Diamondbacks and Boston Red Sox. He was a six-time All-Star, won three World Series championships (including one that broke the fabled "Curse of the Bambino" in 2004 with the Red Sox) and posted a sparkling career playoff ERA of 2.23. However, Jorge L. Ortiz of USA Today argued that Schilling's failure to win a Cy Young Award ...




Softening PED Stance in 2017 Hall of Fame Vote Bodes Well for Bonds, Clemens

Brace yourselves, steroid hard-liners: Barry Bonds and Roger Clemens are going to the Hall of Fame. Not this year. According to results released Wednesday by the Baseball Writers' Association of America, Bonds got 238 votes, or 53.9 percent, and Clemens got 239, or 54.1 percent. (As a side note, anyone who voted for Clemens but not Bonds or vice versa should have their voting privileges immediately revoked.) The threshold for induction is 75 percent, a bar that was cleared by three players: Jeff Bagwell, Tim Raines and Ivan Rodriguez. We can glean two things from this. First, Bonds and Clemens are gaining momentum. Their vote totals have trended northward each year. Now, in year five, they've edged over 50 percent for the first time. That could be due to the shifting demographics of the BBWAA voting block. It could also be the enshrinement of former MLB Commissioner Bud Selig, who oversaw the steroid era and was ...




Jose Canseco Talks 2017 MLB Hall of Fame Results, Jeff Bagwell and Mark McGwire

The 2017 Baseball Hall of Fame class has been announced, and Jose Canseco is not happy about it. According to Andrew Simon of MLB.com, Jeff Bagwell, Tim Raines and Ivan Rodriguez all earned the minimum 75 percent of votes needed to get into Cooperstown, New York.   Canseco took to Twitter to complain about the results: There's going to be more drug users in Cooperstown then The YArd at San Queintin...How the f*** is Jeff Bagwell being inducted into the Hall of Fame and Mark mcgwire's not that is disgusting. It's a great day for the hypocrisy of the Hall of Fame voting induct all that used Peds or induct none. How it's not Mark McGwire Sammy Sosa Roger Clemens Rafael palmeiro not in the Hall of Fame that is a travesty. And definitely bonds should be in the Hall of Fame are you kidding me that is disgusting. [sic] The Hall of Fame induction debate centers around the ...




2017 MLB Hall of Fame Results: Full List of Inductees, Comments and Reaction

Jeff Bagwell, Ivan Rodriguez and Tim Raines will take their rightful place in Cooperstown, New York, after they were announced as the three inductees for the 2017 Baseball Hall of Fame.  Per BBWAA.com, Bagwell received 86.2 percent of the votes, Raines got 86 percent and Rodriguez got 76 percent. Players are required to receive 75 percent for induction.  *Previously announced by Today's Game Era committee in December Baseball Reference tweeted out full vote totals for players on the ballot: Raines was the name commanding a lot of attention this year because it was his final year on the ballot. The seven-time All-Star just missed out making the Hall of Fame in 2016 with 69.8 percent of the vote.  Jay Jaffe of Sports Illustrated made the case for Raines to be inducted into Cooperstown, notably highlighting his peak years from 1983-87: Raines broke out the next year, the beginning of a five-year plateau (1983–87) in which he hit a cumulative .318/.406/.467 and averaged 114 ...




Vladimir Guerrero: The $2,500 Signing with Mismatched Shoes and Clemente Tools

The kid showed up unannounced, riding on the back of a motorcycle, wearing shoes that didn't match. "One was larger than the other," Fred Ferreira remembered. "He had a sock stuffed into one of them so it would fit." It was the spring of 1993, and Ferreira was on the outskirts of Santo Domingo in the Dominican Republic. He works for the Baltimore Orioles now, but he was with the Montreal Expos then, running a tryout camp at a field in Mendoza. The kid with the mismatched shoes was about to become the best player he ever signed. "I've had 72 guys make it up there [to the major leagues]," Ferreira said proudly. Some were stars. Some won World Series. Ferreira thought Bernie Williams deserved Hall of Fame consideration, but he never got there. This week, that kid with the mismatched shoes could be Ferreira's first in Cooperstown. Vladimir Guerrero has a chance in his first year ...




Making Sense of Baseball’s Edgar Martinez, Designated Hitter HOF Debate

The Hall of Fame lists Frank Thomas as a first baseman. Not as a first baseman/designated hitter. Not as a designated hitter/first baseman. Thomas started 340 more games as a DH than he did at first base, but nowhere on his Cooperstown plaque or on his page on the Hall of Fame website does it even mention his time at DH. Paul Molitor is a third baseman, according to the Hall, even though he started 1,168 games as a DH and 786 at third base. When will we put a DH in the Hall of Fame? We already have. Just not Edgar Martinez. He was so good at the job that baseball named the annual DH award after him. He's so connected to the job that you get the feeling it's the biggest thing keeping him out of Cooperstown. He was, as ESPN.com's Jayson Stark wrote, "one of the great hitters of his generation." And yet until ...




Scott Miller’s 2017 Baseball Hall of Fame Ballot

Maybe Barry Bonds, Roger Clemens, Manny Ramirez and others who were on the cutting edge of the performance-enhancing-drug era eventually will be voted into the Hall of Fame by the general electorate. Maybe last month's election of former commissioner Bud Selig will be the tipping point. But that's nonsense. And it's largely a non sequitur. One new "narrative" to emerge this winter in advance of next Wednesday's announcement of the 2017 Hall of Fame voting results is this: If Selig, who oversaw the game when it reeked of cheaters who distorted the record book, is in the Hall of Fame, then it gives voters who in the past have not supported the steroid crowd the green light to reverse course. But it isn't that clear-cut. Selig, like fellow Hall of Famer Tony La Russa three years ago, whose greatest managerial successes came with PED-enhanced players in his lineups, was put into the Hall of ...




Hall of Fame Class 2017: Breaking Down Each Candidate’s Case and Chances

The deadline for voting members of the Baseball Writers Association of America to submit their 2017 Hall of Fame ballots was Dec. 31. In the interest of keeping us all in suspense, however, the results won't be announced until Jan. 18. In the meantime, here's a final look at this year's candidates, their HOF cases and the chances they'll punch a ticket to Cooperstown. We have some data to go on. First, there are past vote totals for players who have been on the ballot before. Second, and even more revealingly, there's the count of public ballots compiled by the indefatigable Ryan Thibodaux. This year's class is a fascinating one, populated by a number of borderline cases sure to spark debate, two titans of the steroid era who are gaining momentum and one worthy but long-spurned leadoff man on the verge of breaking through. Note that we're only discussing players who have a statistical ...




These MLB Stars Are the Only Ones Worthy of 2017 HOF Enshrinement

The first year Barry Bonds and Roger Clemens appeared on the Hall of Fame ballot, I voted "not now." OK, technically I just didn't vote for them, but as I explained then in a column for CBSSports.com, it was more of a "not now" vote than a "not ever" vote. "They may never get in," I wrote, "but my guess is eventually they will." Eventually is coming. It likely won't happen this year based on early voting numbers tracked so carefully by Ryan Thibodaux. But Bonds' and Clemens' numbers went up last year after the Hall of Fame made changes in the electorate, and Thibodaux's tracking numbers suggest they'll rise even more significantly this time around. Some votes switched after a Hall of Fame committee decided to enshrine Bud Selig, the commissioner who oversaw baseball's steroid era. Jeff Passan of Yahoo Sports talked to some of those voters and explained why they switched. The Selig decision didn't ...




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